Time: the best thing about home-education.

“If we experienced life through the eyes of a child, everything would be magical and extraordinary. Let our curiosity, adventure and wonder of life never end.” (Akiane Kramarik)

I left the school system to pursue my education elsewhere at the age of 11. I’m now 18 and so incredibly grateful to my parents for giving this home-education thing a try! I have gotten so much from being able to explore the world at my own pace with the people I choose to spend time with doing things we want to do. What do I value most about home-education and what it has given me? The short answer is ‘time’. The long answer is this blog post…

Picture, for a moment, a toddler or young child. Their minds are constantly evaluating and re-evaluating everything that is happening around them 24/7 even while they sleep. They are constantly learning, exploring, discovering and questioning. Almost everything is exciting to a 3 year old, hence the constant barrage of ‘Why?’ questions. The curiosity of a newly born human is incredible to experience. I am lucky enough to have 3 awesome younger siblings and many incredible cousins who are constantly reminding me (mostly un-intentionally!) the joy in right now. In the family I have long been known as ‘the baby whisperer’ and it’s not a surprise to anyone who knows me that I love spending time with babies and toddlers. They see the world so differently to us and it’s incredible to witness that.

“You’re never going to feel bad about your whole life if you loved people and you were curious.” (Hank Green)

Home-education has given me time to talk with my friends and family for hours, without the stress of being late for my next class. To discuss, debate, argue and laugh. Our conversations range from Pokemon to Politics to Minecraft to Philosophy and everything in between.

“Therasa May said the other day ‘What we need now is certainty!’ We don’t. We never need certainty. Knowledge is not certainty.” (Simon Critchley)

Home-education has given me time to think. To be a curious 3 year old again (that sounds weird haha). To find the infinite beauty in nature, to discover people that I look up to and want to learn from, to work out why I feel sad and what I can do to feel better, to think about the consequences of my actions, to process why I didn’t like what that person said to me yesterday, to discover things I love, to connect with the people around me, to chill out, to work hard, to spend all day on one project, to stop doing things I don’t like, to try new things, to value being and not just doing.

In the last seven years I have discovered so much about myself and the world around me. It’s hard, in our society, to take a step back and breathe. To question everything. To practice true, heart-breaking, overwhelming empathy and compassion. To learn about and consider the opposite opinion to your own and not feel anger and hatred but interest, consideration and respect. What could be more powerful than raising children who do just that?

“Do not ask your children to strive for extraordinary lives. Such striving may seem admirable, but it is the way of foolishness. Help them instead to find the wonder and the marvel of an ordinary life. Show them the joy of tasting tomatoes, apples and pears. Show them how to cry when pets and people die. Show them the infinite pleasure in the touch of a hand. And make the ordinary come alive for them. The extraordinary will take care of itself.” (William Martin)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s